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If you’ve been playing any instrument for some time around other musicians then you’ve probably had some uncomfortable interactions with others. Being in the music industry, this is sadly inevitable. Many people lack social awareness or learned bad ideologies or behaviors when they were young. I’ll go through a few examples throughout this post.

Ensemble rehearsals:

Greet your section mates. It’s really rude to sit right next to someone you know and not acknowledge them. You don’t need to have a full on conversation before rehearsal starts but at least give a sincere welcome. During rehearsal you may be doing…


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For us music students, choosing a school to attend can be a stressful time in our lives and is also a much different experience than non-music students. There are of course a lot of similarities though in what factors play into us choosing a school and what we value. Is it close to home? How expensive is tuition? Do sports programs matter? What amenities does the university have? To a non-music student these are the normal factors in decisions. But to music students, there are other factors, specifically the school of music itself. How big is the school? What kind…


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I grew up in the suburbs of Boston, in a very well constructed and well funded music program, and there were lots of benefits to this. I was surrounded by plenty of other young musicians who wanted to be successful, and our school sent lots of people to districts and all state festivals every year. Being in Boston was also amazing in terms of musical exposure: the BSO (and Boston pops), NEC and their many youth orchestras, wind ensembles, and choirs, Berklee, etc. However, in this major orchestra city, most wind players strived for orchestra seats and put wind ensembles…


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It is hard for many entering their undergraduate to imagine themselves as any kind of independent professional within the next four years or so. Admittedly, I did not always think that when I was screwing around in Woodwind Techniques class (as brass players do) my freshman year that this information is extremely vital for myself as an educator within a three-year timespan. College is a great environment: you have the ability to surround yourself with great people and too many great resources than you may realize at the time. …


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As a junior in college, I’m closer to finishing my degree than starting it. As such, I’ve sat through more classes than I ever wished I had to — Music Theory, Religions of Asia, Food Anthropology, etc.. In many of these classes, I’ve questioned the amount of value that they have to me and my music career. It’s hard to say that reading a translation of a thousands-of-years-old religious text is valuable in the moment, and I think the entire notion of value in education is individualistic and develops over time. In my personal musical development, I’ve found that I…


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We all experience acne at some point in our lives, whether it be pimples, whiteheads, blackheads, etc. Acne really damages one’s self-esteem and can hinder one’s life in many ways. One of the downsides of having acne-prone skin and playing a brass instrument is that some days you just can’t play because of how painful it is to touch the instrument to your face. If you’ve ever had a pimple right where you put your mouthpiece then you know exactly what I’m talking about. …


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There’s a big debate in the music school community as to whether or not students who want to pursue a career in performance should get their undergraduate degree in music education. The people in favor of students doing this will say that you need a backup plan that actually allows a student to teach in case they don’t win a performing job. The other side of the argument is that if a student actually wants to pursue a performance career, they shouldn’t be forced to be in a degree they don’t actually want to be in. …


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I moved away from home to start my graduate studies when I was 21. I was lucky enough to attend a school for my Bachelor’s degree that was only a 40-minute drive from my parents’ house. That first step towards independence helped to make my move from Florida to Indiana a little easier. Despite this, I still found the first few months away from home to be pretty difficult, and I still feel the way to an extent, especially given the current state of the world. …


When I came to Indiana for graduate school back in the fall of 2019 I was both nervous and ecstatic. I got into my dream program and was about to start studying with one of the world’s most renowned euphonium players, Demondrae Thurman. But then March 2020 happened. At first I was a little confused, but there was a plan in place. Like everyone else in music school, we soon learned that the rest of the semester would be virtual and we were told to go home and stay home. The problem for musicians is that’s easier said than done…

Indiana Euphoniums

A blog by members of the Indiana euphonium studio!

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